Weekly Flash Briefing 5/12/2020

Posted by Drew Creekmur, MSPFP on 1:22 PM on May 12, 2020

Hot Topics

Why is the Stock Market increasing in the midst of such uncertainty?

This year has been quite the ride in markets both domestic and global. Here in the U.S. we have experienced the quickest slide into a bear market in history, followed by an equally incredible market bounce in short order:

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Topics: Financial Planning, Planning, Saving, Stock Market

Reducing the Risk of Outliving Your Money

Posted by Creekmur Wealth Advisors on 2:17 PM on April 2, 2020

What steps might help you sustain and grow your retirement savings?

“What is your greatest retirement fear?” If you ask any group of retirees and pre-retirees this question, “outliving my money” will likely be one of the top answers. In fact, 51% of investors surveyed for a 2019 AIG retirement study ranked outliving their money as their top anxiety.1

 

Retirees face greater “longevity risk” today.The Census Bureau says that Americans typically retire around age 63. Social Security projects that today’s 63-year-olds will live into their mid-eighties, on average. This is a mean life expectancy, so while some of these seniors may pass away earlier, others may live past 90 or 100.2,3

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Topics: Money Matters, Planning, Saving, Social Security income

Rules of Thumb In Times Like These

Posted by Drew Creekmur, MSPFP on 12:24 PM on March 18, 2020

When did you first notice that something unprecedented was occurring with the Covid-19 virus?

I currently live in Washington D.C. and up until last week there were no noticeable differences in day to day life. However, I recognized the unusual nature of this situation last week when I headed down to Trader Joe’s to stock up on groceries for the next few weeks. Millennial that I am, I thought that if I got to Trader Joe’s 5 minutes before the doors opened at 8:00 AM that I would have the place to myself – I couldn’t have been more wrong.

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Topics: Financial Planning, market volatility, Planning, Retirement, Saving

Ways To Repair Your Credit Score

Posted by Creekmur Wealth Advisors on 11:30 AM on March 12, 2020

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Steps to get your credit rating back toward 720.

We all know the value of a good credit score. We all try to maintain one. Sometimes, though, life throws us a financial curveball and that score declines. What steps can we take to repair it?

 

Reduce your credit utilization ratio. Your credit utilization ratio (CUR) is the percentage of a credit card’s debt limit you have used up. Simply stated, if you have a credit card with a limit of $1,500 and you have $1,300 borrowed on it right now, the CUR for that card is 87%. Carrying lower balances on your credit cards tilts the CUR in your favor and promotes a better credit score.1


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Topics: get my credit score reviewed, Planning, Saving

When A Windfall Comes Your Way

Posted by Creekmur Wealth Advisors on 11:15 AM on February 27, 2020

What do you do with big money?

Getting rich quick can be liberating, but it can also be frustrating. Sudden wealth can help you address retirement saving or college funding anxieties, and it may also allow you to live and work on your terms. On the other hand, you’ll pay more taxes, attract more attention, and maybe even contend with jealousy or envy. You may also deal with grief or stress, as a lump sum may be linked to a death, a divorce, or a pension payout decision.


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Topics: Financial Planning, Planning, Retirement, Saving

A Retirement Fact Sheet

Posted by Creekmur Staff on 11:45 AM on January 30, 2020

Some specifics about the "second act."

Does your vision of retirement align with the facts? Here are some noteworthy financial and lifestyle facts about life after 50 that might surprise you. 

Up to 85% of a retiree’s Social Security income can be taxed. Some retirees are taken aback when they discover this. In addition to the Internal Revenue Service, 13 states currently levy taxes on some or all Social Security retirement benefits: Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, and West Virginia. (West Virginia, incidentally, is phasing out such taxation.)1

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Topics: Wealth Management, Financial Planning, IRA, Retirement, Saving, Social Security, Tax on Social Security Income, Taxes in Retirment

Retirement Wellness

Posted by Creekmur Wealth Advisors on 6:45 AM on January 9, 2020

How healthy a retirement do you think you will have? If you can stay activeas a seniorand curb or avoid certain habits, you could potentially reduceonetype of retirement expense.

Each year, Fidelity Investments presents an analysisof retiree health care costs. In 2019, Fidelity projected that the average 65-year-old couple would spend around $285,000 on health care during retirement, including about $11,000 in the first year. Both projections took Medicare benefits into account.1,2


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Topics: Financial Planning, Planning, Retirement, Saving

Why Do People Put Off Saving For Retirement?

Posted by Creekmur Wealth Advisors on 9:15 AM on June 26, 2018

A lack of money is but one answer.

Common wisdom says that you should start saving for retirement as soon as you can. Why do some people wait decades to begin?

Nearly everyone can save something. Even small cash savings may be the start of something big if they are invested wisely.

Sometimes, the immediate wins out over the distant. To young adults, retirement can seem so far away. Instead of directing X dollars a month toward some far-off financial objective, why not use it for something here and now, like a payment on a student loan or a car? This is indeed practical, and it may be necessary. Even so, paying yourself first should be as much of a priority as paying today’s bills or paying your creditors.

Some workers fail to enroll in retirement plans because they anticipate leaving. They start a job with an assumption that it may only be short term, so they avoid signing up, even though human resources encourages them. Time passes. Six months turn into six years. Still, they are unenrolled. (Speaking of short-term or transitory work, many people in the gig economy never get such encouragement; they have no access to a workplace retirement plan at all.)

Other young adults feel they have too little to start saving or investing. Maybe when they are further along in their careers, the time will be right – but not now. Currently, they cannot contribute big monthly or quarterly amounts to retirement accounts, so what is the point of starting today?

The point can be expressed in two words: compound interest. Even small retirement account contributions have potential to snowball into much larger sums with time. Suppose a 25-year-old puts just $100 in a retirement plan earning 8% a year. Suppose they keep doing that every month for 35 years. How much money is in the account at age 60? $100 x 12 x 35, or $42,000? No, $217,114, thanks to annual compounded growth. As their salary grows, the monthly contributions can increase, thereby positioning the account to grow even larger. Another important thing to remember is that the longer a sum has been left to compound, the greater the annual compounding becomes. The takeaway here: get an early start.1

Any retirement saver should strive to get an employer match. Some companies will match a percentage of a worker’s retirement plan contribution once it exceeds a certain level. This is literally free money. Who would turn down free money?

Just how many Americans are not yet saving for retirement? Earlier this year, an Edward Jones survey put the figure at 51%. If you are reading this, you are likely in the other 49% and have been for some time. Keep up the good work.2
Download our complimentary e-book on 5 retirement planning missteps to dodge

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Topics: Uncategorized, Wealth Management, Build True Wealth, Financial Freedom, Financial Planning, Investing, Investments, Money, Retirement, Saving

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